Out of the dark, into the light: McGill to get visible storage gallery

La version française suit

By Vanessa Di Francesco, Assistant Curator, McGill Visual Arts Collection

In many of the world’s largest museums, only a very small fraction of collected objects are put on view, in publicly accessible spaces, at any given time. So, where is the rest of it? Most museums and professionally managed collections have storage facilities varying in size and functionality. Many objects in museum collections are too fragile or valuable to be on permanent gallery display plus there is simply not enough space in most museums to show absolutely everything. Countless objects live in a storage facility that has been tailor-made for their preservation, picked from the rack for special occasions only.

McGill’s Visual Arts Collection reverses this modus operandi to some degree: as a collection spread out across two campuses and nearly 80 buildings, most of the nearly 3,000 artworks and objects in our care are on long-term view, with only a small fraction housed in a controlled storage facility in the McLennan Library Building. Our display philosophy drives our collection practices: we rarely take in artworks that are not suited to sustained, unmediated display in variable conditions.

Visible Storage Study Center at the Luce Center for American Art, Brooklyn Museum. Image courtesy of Brooklyn Museum website.

Visible Storage Study Center at the Luce Center for American Art, Brooklyn Museum. Image courtesy of Brooklyn Museum website.

Still, not everything can be on display all the time. Moreover, in rare instances, we do collect art that, because of its format or fragility, cannot circulate outside of a controlled environment or, because of its subject matter, is difficult to place without accompanying interpretation. The safekeeping and preservation of these objects is, as with any collection, a primary mandate. But just as significant, is our collection’s role as a cultural resource, and as a tool for teaching and learning. In this role, visibility, not storage, is key. So, how do we show what we otherwise cannot show?

Figure 2: Visible Storage Gallery at the Artbank of Australia. Image courtesy of Artbank website.

Figure 2: Visible Storage Gallery at the Artbank of Australia. Image courtesy of Artbank website.

 

Digitization projects that bring stored artworks and artifacts to millions of virtual visitors is one way museums and cultural institutions negotiate their contradicting mandates. But as many museum professionals and art historians maintain, there is nothing quite like seeing the “real thing.” In recent years, the increasingly popular trend of “visible storage” has helped museums all over the world open their closets, if you will, to the public. Top institutions like the Met, the AGO, and the Brooklyn Museum have built out innovative spaces that serve the dual purposes of storage and display, where visitors can see thousands of otherwise packed away objects in galleries that essentially mimic storage facility conditions, but are open and accessible. Different institutions do it differently, and the display of framed art is especially varied. In some cases, paintings are hung and stacked on storage screens, sometimes behind vitrines (Fig. 1). In others, available wall space is packed with paintings and prints in a staggered display that maximizes wall space, much in the style of gallery walls in Victorian homes or in early modern Wunderkammers (“wonder-rooms”) (Fig. 2).

Figure 3: A detail of the hallway leading to the Rare Books, Special Collections, and Archives Reading Room in the McLennan Library, 4th Floor –the future home of a Visible Storage Gallery.

Figure 3: A detail of the hallway leading to the Rare Books, Special Collections, and Archives Reading Room in the McLennan Library, 4th Floor –the future home of a Visible Storage Gallery.

Inspired by these and other open storage spaces, the McGill Visual Arts Collection is currently planning a gallery on the fourth floor of the McLennan Library Building, in the hallway to the Reading Room of Rare Books, Special Collections, and Archives (Fig. 3). Here, many artworks currently in storage will be on long-term public view in a controlled space. Paintings otherwise out of view will be displayed with accompanying interpretative material: a display cabinet complete with drawers will offer the opportunity to show unframed works on paper which cannot otherwise circulate, and some of the sculptures we have been unable to place across campus will finally find a home.

Figure 4: Visual Arts Collection intern, Tara-Allen Flanagan, looking over preliminary plans for the painting display in the Visible Storgae Gallery.

Figure 4: Visual Arts Collection intern, Tara-Allen Flanagan, looking over preliminary plans for the painting display in the Visible Storage Gallery.

Adjacent to the Reading Room, the open storage will be well-frequented, introducing students and researchers to a curated sample of the Collection, and alerting them to its great potential for research. For a collection spread out so far and wide, the open storage space also provides the opportunity to put works in conversation with one another, and highlight the great variety of the University’s holdings in visual arts in a single, cohesive space (Fig. 4).

The Visible Storage Gallery is scheduled for the upcoming academic year (2017-18). Keep an eye out on our website and in Library news for a launch date.

 


De l’ombre à la lumière : McGill aura sa galerie de réserves visitables

Par Vanessa Di Francesco, conservatrice adjointe

La plupart du temps, dans nombre de grands musées du monde, seule une petite fraction des pièces de collection est visible dans des espaces accessibles au public. Alors, où se trouve le reste? La plupart des musées et collections gérées professionnellement ont des installations d’entreposage dont la taille et la fonctionnalité varient. De nombreuses pièces de collection des musées sont trop fragiles ou d’une trop grande valeur pour être présentées dans une aire d’exposition permanente. Qui plus est, la plupart des musées manquent tout simplement de place pour exposer absolument tout. D’innombrables objets d’art restent à l’abri dans des installations d’entreposage conçues pour leur préservation et n’en sortent que pour des occasions spéciales.

Pour sa Collection d’arts visuels, McGill va un peu à l’encontre de ce modus operandi : la collection est répartie sur deux campus et dans près de 80 immeubles, et les 3000 œuvres d’art et objets dont l’Université assure la conservation sont pour la plupart exposés à long terme; seule une petite partie de la collection est protégée dans des installations contrôlées de l’édifice de la bibliothèque McLennan. Notre philosophie en matière de conservation dicte nos pratiques concernant les acquisitions : nous acceptons rarement des œuvres d’art qui ne se prêtent pas à une exposition durable dans des conditions variables, et qui exigent des mesures particulières.

Visible Storage Study Center at the Luce Center for American Art, Brooklyn Museum. Image courtesy of Brooklyn Museum website.

Fig. 1 : Centre d’étude des réserves visitables, au Luce Center for American Art, musée de Brooklyn. Illustration reproduite du site web du musée de Brooklyn.

Nous ne pouvons certainement pas tout exposer en même temps. En plus, dans de rares cas, nous collectionnons des œuvres qu’il faut placer dans un environnement contrôlé en raison de leur format ou de leur fragilité, ou qu’il est difficile d’exposer sans matériel d’interprétation, en raison de leur nature. Comme pour toute collection, la mission première est la protection et la préservation de ces pièces. Toutefois, notre collection joue un rôle tout aussi important en tant que ressource culturelle et outil d’enseignement et d’apprentissage. Pour ce rôle, l’élément important est la visibilité, plutôt que le mode d’entreposage. Alors, comment exposer ce qui ne peut pas être exposé?

Figure 2: Visible Storage Gallery at the Artbank of Australia. Image courtesy of Artbank website.

Fig. 2 : Galerie de réserves visitables à Artbank of Australia. Illustration reproduite du site web Artbank.

 

Pour remplir leur mission contradictoire, les musées et les établissements culturels ont recours à des moyens comme les projets de numérisation pour donner la possibilité à des millions de visiteurs virtuels de voir des œuvres d’art et des artéfacts. Toutefois, comme le clament de nombreux professionnels des musées et historiens de l’art, il n’y a rien de mieux qu’une vraie visite. Ces dernières années, la popularité croissante des « réserves visitables » a pour ainsi dire permis à des musées du monde d’ouvrir leurs placards au public. Des établissements de premier ordre comme le Met, AGO, et le musée de Brooklyn ont aménagé des espaces novateurs qui répondent aux deux objectifs, l’entreposage et l’exposition. Les visiteurs peuvent y voir des milliers d’objets autrement inaccessibles, exposés dans des galeries qui imitent essentiellement les conditions d’entreposage, mais ouvertes et accessibles au public. Divers établissements procèdent autrement, et les systèmes d’exposition des œuvres d’art encadrées, en particulier, sont très variés. Dans certains cas, on suspend et superpose les tableaux sur un système de stockage à glissières, parfois derrière une vitrine (Fig. 1). Dans d’autres cas, les tableaux et gravures sont disposés en quinconce sur l’espace mural de façon à maximiser celui‑ci, dans le style des galeries murales des demeures victoriennes ou dans les Wunderkammers (« wonder-rooms ») du début de l’époque moderne (Fig. 2).

Figure 3: A detail of the hallway leading to the Rare Books, Special Collections, and Archives Reading Room in the McLennan Library, 4th Floor –the future home of a Visible Storage Gallery.

Fig. 3 : Couloir qui mène à la salle de lecture des Livres rares, collections spécialisées et archives à la pavillon McLennan de la bibliothèque, 4e étage – futur emplacement de la Galerie des réserves visitables.

À la Collection d’arts visuels de McGill, les divers types de réserves accessibles ont inspiré le projet d’aménagement d’une galerie au quatrième étage de l’édifice McLennan dans le couloir qui mène à la salle de lecture des livres rares, collections spécialisées et archives (Fig. 3). On y exposera de nombreuses œuvres d’art actuellement gardées dans un espace contrôlé, et le public y aura accès à long terme. La galerie exposera des tableaux normalement inaccessibles accompagnés de matériel d’interprétation : un présentoir avec tiroirs montrera des œuvres sur papier non encadrées, autrement inaccessibles, et certaines sculptures encore jamais exposées sur le campus trouveront finalement leur place.

Figure 4: Visual Arts Collection intern, Tara-Allen Flanagan, looking over preliminary plans for the painting display in the Visible Storgae Gallery.

Fig. 4 : Stagiaire à la Collection d’arts visuels, Tara-Allen Flanagan examine les plans provisoires pour l’exposition des tableaux d’art dans la Galerie des réserves visitables.

Adjacente à la salle de lecture, la réserve accessible sera très achalandée et présentera aux étudiants et chercheurs un avant-goût des pièces conservées de la Collection tout en les sensibilisant à l’énorme potentiel pour la recherche. La collection étant dispersée un peu partout, l’espace de la réserve accessible offre également la possibilité de créer un rapport interactif entre les œuvres, et met en évidence la grande variété des ressources de l’Université dans le domaine des arts visuels, dans un seul et même espace cohérent (Fig. 4).

La Galerie des réserves visitables est prévue pour la prochaine année universitaire (2017-2018). Consultez le site Web et Library news pour connaître la date du lancement.

Leave a Reply

Library Matters seeks to exchange and encourage ideas, innovations and information from McGill Library staff for our on-campus readers and beyond.
Contact Us!

If you have any questions, comments, or even an idea for a story, let us know!