Blog Archives

McGill at War: Commemorating the Centenary of the End of the First World War

This exhibition commemorates the centenary of the armistice of November 11, 1918, which saw the end of a war which profoundly marked the bodies, minds, and spirits of those who experienced it, both in and out of uniform. The First

Charles Taylor and Expressive Individualism in McGill University Archives

Since the publication of The Explanation of Behaviour in the mid-1960s, Charles Taylor has written on everything from philosophy of mind and language to secularism, multiculturalism, democracy, and identity.  His magnum opus, Sources of the Self, marked his nearly thirty

Book annotations as witness to the Dutch influence in Japan during the Edo period

        During the Edo period, from the mid-17th to the mid-19th century, Japan adopted an isolationist policy. At this time, the only Westerners allowed access to the country were the Dutch, who were permitted to trade from

From the Beagle to the Bookshelf: Darwin at McGill Library

A ROAAring congratulations to McGill biologist Dr. Ehab Abouheif and his team of researchers on their study of ants, which led to the discovery of a solution to an evolutionary conundrum that made Charles Darwin question his own theory of

What’s the Big Deal with Professors’ Fonds?

You would believe a professor’s life ends at our school’s doorsteps Some of us students have this funny idea that professors are bound behind thick round glasses and pile upon pile of corrections due in a week or so. And

“Happily Scottish and Proudly Canadian” : The Sons of Scotland at ROAAr

By Olivia Kurajian, Rare Books and Special Collections Summer Intern, August 2018   Our community is beholden to the Scots. James McGill, a Scottish immigrant, formed McGill University’s precursor, McGill College, and is the namesake of the current institution. Now,

Anatomizing Thomas Rowlandson’s representation of William Hunter’s dissecting room

Guest contributor: Margaret Carlyle, Ph.D. U Chicago, Institute on the Formation of Knowledge 2018 recipient, Dr. Edward H. Bensley Osler Library Research Travel Grant   Thomas Rowlandson’s original watercolour drawing of William Hunter’s (1718–1783) London anatomy school on Great Windmill Street

A Sublime Sense of Artistry and Sentimentality in Archives

By Nikolas Lamarre Nothing says Romanticism more than the inevitable connection between a man and his love for flowers: Nature’s very own living souls. “To the Myrtle”: Sweet emblem of all that is loving and true, Fair child of the

Exhibit News – Autopsy: from Sight to Knowledge

A discussion of an orginal watercolour by famed British caricaturist Thomas Rowlandson, drawn from the exhibit Autopsy: from Sight to Knowledge currently on display in the McLennan Main Lobby through to September 10th 2018.  Bilingual captions English- French. Presented in French by

A Spy Among Us

It is fascinating what unexpected discoveries can be made in the McGill University Archives. This month, during my graduate studies internship with MUA, I discovered a Soviet spy. Working at McGill University. During the Second World War. It all started

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